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1971 genocide one of history's worst: Many Pakistanis say

By Asraful Huq

DHAKA, March 16, 2015 (BSS)- Many Pakistanis particularly, the intellectuals felt that the genocide of 1971 was the worst in
history.

"But, the genocide in East Pakistan (now Bangladesh) carried out by the Pakistani occupation forces in the last five months had exceeded horrors of all previous genocides," a booklet said in its introduction referring to the worst bloodsheds in Indonesia and Germany.

Pakistan Forum, a platform of intellectuals of West Pakistan, published an 80-page booklet titled "East Bengal: roots of the GENOCIDE" during the War of Liberation.

They published the booklet with the help of Friends of East Bengal to inform the world community about the Pakistani atrocities on Bangladeshis.

Many Pakistanis including Intellectuals, journalists and politicians residing both in and outside Pakistan came forward to back the war and because of that a good number of Pakistanis had to suffer jail terms and inhuman torture.

Pakistani poets Ahmed Selim and Habib Jaleb had gone through inhuman torture and suffered jail for writing poems supporting the Liberation War of Bangladesh. At that time, some Pakistanis including Majhar Ali Khan, Tahera Majhar and Asgor Khan gave a statement supporting the war.

Asgor Khan's son, who was in the Pakistani army, was also held and tortured for his father's statement.

With a view to attracting public and international support to the war, Pakistani intellectuals formed a corps headlined "Pakistan Forum" (PF). Its main motto was to inform the world community, Why the Liberation War was being held?

Firoz Ahmed, who wrote essays on French and American newspapers, was Secretary of Pakistan Forum. There were some essays and articles in the publication.

Americans formed a platform in the USA in 1971 with a motto what they said, "We share a common concern." It was named "Friends of East Bengal". Its headquarter was in New York.

A letter of Pakistani researcher also Bihari, Iqbal Ahmed and his three friends was published in the New York Times on April 10 in 1971. In the letter, the researcher of Pakistan heavily criticized the atrocities on Bangladeshis by Pakistani junta.

Noted historian Professor Dr Muntassir Mamoon in articles "Anek Pakistanio Agie Asechhilen Amader Pakkhe" and Muktijuddhe Simanta Gandhi Pakistanider Ja Bolechhilen" in his edited book "Muktijuddher Chhinna Dalilpatra" narrated the role of Pakistani intellectuals in the War of Liberation.